The poetry of Allison Grayhurst

Walkways cover 2“Her poems read like the journal entries of a mystic – perhaps that what they are. They are abstract and vivid, like a dreamy manifestation of soul. This is the best way, in prose, one can describe the music which is … the poetry of Allison Grayhurst.” – Blaise Wigglesworth, “Oh! Magazine: Ryerson’s Arts and Culture Voice”.

Read at your peril. You will never look at this world in quite the same way again. Your eye will instinctively search the sky for eagles and scan the dark earth for the slightest movement of smallest ant, your heart will reach for tall mountains, bathe in the most intimate of passions and in the grain and grit of our earth. Such is Allison Grayhurst. Such is her poetry,” Eric M. Vogt, poet and author.

“Grayhurst is a great Canadian poet. All of Allison Grayhurst’s poetry is original, sometimes startling, and more often than not, powerful. Anyone who loves modern poetry that does not follow the common path will find Grayhurst complex, insightful, and as good a poet as anyone writing in the world today. Grayhurst’s poetry volumes are highly, highly recommended,” Tom Davis, poet, novelist and educator.

“Grayhurst’s poetry is a translucent, ethereal dream in which words push through the fog, always searching, struggling, and reaching for the powerful soul at its heart. Her work is vibrant and shockingly original,” Beach Holme Publishers.

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“What a treasure Allison Grayhurst is. Her gift? To unfold for us life at this intensity of feeling and revelation. Who knew truth and beauty could be so intertwined and so passionate?,” Taylor Jane Green, BA, RIHR, CH, Registered Holistic Talk Therapist and author.

“Her (Allison Grayhurst’s) poetry appears visceral, not for the faint of heart, and moves forward with a dynamism, with a frenetic pulse. If you seek the truth, the physical blood and bones, then, by all means, open the world into which we were all born,” Anne Burke, poet, regional representative for Alberta on the League of Canadian Poets’ Council, and chair of the Feminist Caucus.

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Allison Grayhurst is a full member of the League of Canadian Poets. Three of her poems have been nominated for Sundress Publications “Best of the Net” 2015, and she has more than 850 poems published in over 380 international literary magazines, journals and anthologies in Canada, United States, England, India, Ireland, China, Scotland, Wales, Austria, Romania, New Zealand, Bangladesh, Colombia and Australia.                                                                                                                              

Her book Somewhere Falling was published by Beach Holme Publishers, a Porcepic Book, in Vancouver in 1995. Since then she has published twelve other books of poetry and seven collections with Edge Unlimited Publishing. Prior to the publication of Somewhere Falling she had a poetry book published, Common Dream, and four chapbooks published by The Plowman. Her poetry chapbook The River is Blind was published by Ottawa publisher above/ground press December 2012. In 2014 her chapbook Surrogate Dharma was published by Kind of a Hurricane Press, Barometric Pressures Author Series. In 2015, her book No Raft – No Ocean was published by Scars Publications. More recently, her book Make the Wind was published in 2016 by Scars Publications. As well, her book Trial and Witness – selected poems, was published in 2016 by Creative Talents Unleashed (CTU Publishing Group).

Some of places her work has appeared in include Parabola (Alone & Together print issue summer 2012); Elephant Journal; Literary Orphans; Blue Fifth Review; The American Aesthetic; Drunk Monkeys, Agave Magazine; JuxtaProse Literary Magazine, South Florida Arts Journal; Gris-Gris; New Binary Press Anthology; The Brooklyn Voice; Straylight Literary Magazine; The Milo Review; Foliate Oak Literary Magazine; The Antigonish Review; Dalhousie Review; The New Quarterly; Wascana Review; Poetry Nottingham International; The Cape Rock; Ayris; Journal of Contemporary Anglo-Scandinavian Poetry; The Toronto Quarterly; Fogged Clarity, Boston Poetry Magazine; Decanto; White Wall Review.  

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Fire and more. front cover

Over 850 of Allison Grayhurst’s published poems are available to read on this website. Most of these poems are accompanied by Allison Grayhurst’s audio reading of the poem.

Almost all of Allison Grayhurst’s books are available for a free reading on Issuu and/or a PDF file link to download from the page on the main menu:

Free reading/download of books

https://issuu.com/allisongrayhurst

 

 

 

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Amazon Author Pageamazon.com/author/allisongrayhurst

UK Amazon Author Page: http://www.amazon.co.uk/-/e/B001KIWQUS

Amazon.ca: http://www.amazon.ca/s?_encoding=UTF8&field-author=Allison%20Grayhurst&search-alias=books-ca

The League of Canadian Poets: http://poets.ca/membee-directory/#action=Listing&value=116&searchID=3286&cid=1043&did=100

Poets&Writers: http://www.pw.org/content/allison_grayhurst

Goodreads Author: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/1937690.Allison_Grayhurst

E-mail: allisongrayhurst@rogers.com

Creative Talents Unleashed (CTU Publishing Group) Author Page: http://www.ctupublishinggroup.com/allison-grayhurst-.html

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(Please scroll down to see new posts and sculpture images on the side bar. All sculptures were made by Allison Grayhurst.)

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Links to poems by title

Links by title to read each poem on this website – organized by books (please note if there is no link, the poem is only available to read in the book)     Book 1 Journey of the Awakening…

Source: Links to poems by title

Update

Five years ago I started a dual journey to publish my poetry and to create a website that would be a permanent home to my work.

Everyone one of my poems that I have wanted published over the last 25 years has now been individually published in journals, magazines and/or anthologies. Each one is also available to read on my website. This amounts to about 850 poems.

As well, these poems are part of my 22 published books and 2 published chapbooks, most of which are available to buy as paperback or kindle or to read for free on issue or download for free as a pdf file. Or you can find/read each poem by title –           links below:
Amazon Author Page: amazon.com/author/allisongrayhurst
Issuu: https://issuu.com/allisongrayhurst
Free PDF download: https://allisongrayhurst.com/free-pdf-download-of-books/              Links to each poem by title: https://allisongrayhurst.com/links-to-poems-by-title/

My website with all my work on it will remain indefinitely, but I won’t be posting poems daily. Anything further I share will be recent work, although it may take a while before anything new appears, and when I do post, it will be sporadic.

Any reviews of my books will always be welcome and appreciated.

Please feel free to share my work as long as I am credited as such –                           Copyright © by Allison Grayhurst

I would like to thank all my readers, publishers and the WordPress friends I have made along the way.

Blessings,
Allison Grayhurst

new poem – not a poem

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new poem – not a poem

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Block and embrace the energy action,

circular, the fastest stroke of curved precision.

Bend to grow strong and final as a setting sun

seems to be.

Above all else, wait for the promise to gain

momentum, height, far from where

the common acceptance will allow.

Wait for the baptism, the tenth time around, baptism

into deeper layers of valley rhythms – heaven is in these depths.

Fulfilment and freedom comes better under the weight of

spiritual obligation to God.

       To God:

I climb close to you. I find you outside

of my lineage, including my walking and my

destination. I know you now as a solid

certainty. I love you though I am still

close to breaking, close to you,

permanently placed on the threshold

where all things begin and all things end.

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Copyright © 2015 by Allison Grayhurst

Fire and more cover - Copy

Make the Wind cover

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Published in “Aji Magazine, Issue 4” Spring 2016

Aji Magazine 4

Aji Magazzine 1 Aji Magazzine 2 Aji Magazine 3 Aji New poem

http://www.ajimagazine.com/issue-4-spring-2016.html

http://www.ajimagazine.com/uploads/2/2/2/8/22289112/aji_magazine_spring_2016.pdf

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Make the wind contentsMake the wind new poem

http://scars.tv/pdf/2016/Make_the_Wind20160404Allison_Grayhurst.pdf

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Scars full 3Scars full 1 Scars full 2Scars new poem 1 Scars new poem 2

http://scars.tv/cgi-bin/framesmain.pl?writers

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You can listen to the poem by clicking below:

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“Grayhurst’s poetry is a translucent, ethereal dream in which words push through the fog, always searching, struggling, and reaching for the powerful soul at its heart. Her work is vibrant and shockingly original,” Beach Holme Publishers.

“Allison’s poetic prose is insightful, enwrapping, illuminating and brutally truthful. It probes the nature of the human spirit, relationships, spirituality and God. It is sung as the clearest song is sung within a cathedral by choir. It is whispered as faintly as a heartbroken goodbye. It is alive with the life of a thousand birds in flight within the first glint of morning sun. It is as solemn as the sad-sung ballad of a noble death. Read at your peril. You will never look at this world in quite the same way again. Your eye will instinctively search the sky for eagles and scan the dark earth for the slightest movement of smallest ant, your heart will reach for tall mountains, bathe in the most intimate of passions and in the grain and grit of our earth. Such is Allison Grayhurst. Such is her poetry,”  Eric M. Vogt, poet and author.

“Grayhurst is a great Canadian poet. All of Allison Grayhurst’s poetry is original, sometimes startling, and more often than not, powerful. Anyone who loves modern poetry that does not follow the common path will find Grayhurst complex, insightful, and as good a poet as anyone writing in the world today. Grayhurst’s poetry volumes are highly, highly recommended,” Tom Davis, poet, novelist and educator.
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Currents – pastlife poems

Currents - pastlife poems cover 4Backcover currents

http://www.amazon.com/Currents-pastlife-poems-Allison-Grayhurst/dp/1533311269/ref=la_B001KIWQUS_1_41?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1463777394&sr=1-41&refinements=p_82%3AB001KIWQUS

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Currents – pastlife poems – The poetry of Allison Grayhurst

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The Flat Plane of Imaginary Heaven

 

The Flat Plane of Imaginary Heaven

Far, as the minute mile

that rests on my shoulders

like a dream, waterlogged.

Dirt under my fingernails

that won’t go away.

Summer on my tongue

that won’t go down smooth,

won’t let me near the balloons

or the genuine smile, takes me out of my nest

and puts me centre floor

with the predators – with the dangers

of too-strong a dream,

or like petals caught in the wind.

I begin

to fly

without direction or control,

fly without decision, but wanting a change,

wanting to ride the log down the river,

steering with perfect gusto.

The complex edges of touch,

the final shadow of all once loved

passing over like a life undone,

like a place of magic

but without God,

like a place of kindness but no warmth,

or like perfection lacking any sense of surrender –

bound to the shackles of a predictable reality.

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Copyright © 2008 by Allison Grayhurst

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First published in “Aji Magazine, Issue 4”, Spring 2016

Aji Magazine 4

Aji Magazzine 1 Aji Magazzine 2 Aji Magazine 3 Aji The Flat Plane

http://www.ajimagazine.com/issue-4-spring-2016.html

http://www.ajimagazine.com/uploads/2/2/2/8/22289112/aji_magazine_spring_2016.pdf

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You can listen to the poem by clicking below:

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“Allison Grayhurst intertwines a potent spirituality throughout her work so that each poem is not simply a statement or observation, but a revelation that demands the reader’s personal involvement. Grayhurst’s poetic genius is profound and evident. Her voice is uniquely authentic, undeniable in its dignified vulnerability as it is in its significance,” Kyp Harness, singer/songwriter, author.

“Allison Grayhurst’s poems are like cathedrals witnessing and articulating in unflinching graphic detail the gritty angst and grief of life, while taking it to rare clarity, calm and comfort. Grayhurst’s work is haunting, majestic and cleansing, often leaving one breathless in the wake of its intelligence, hope, faith and love amidst the muck of life. Many of Allison Grayhurst’s poems are simply masterpieces. Grayhurst’s poetry is a lighthouse of intelligent honour… indeed, intelligence rips through her work like white water,” Taylor Jane Green, Registered Spiritual Psychotherapist and author.

Reviews of ‘The Many Lights of Eden’:

“’The Many Lights of Eden’ is a journey: a journey of the heart through youth, anguish, struggle, spiritual awakening, grief, death, love, loss, guilt, struggle, despair, hope, surrender, God, sensuality, imperfection, motherhood, aging, the vanquishing of the devil, indeed, many devils, the inevitable fall from perfection and the casting off of old wineskins for a new one. Perhaps speaking of this book as a chronicle of spiritual maturing would be more accurate, the realization that there is spirituality within imperfection and that handmade temples cannot hope to compete with the spiritual temples within each of us. ‘The Many Lights of Eden’ is a diamond. It is a beautiful collection of insights. Allison Grayhurst’s thoughts and writings are a deep well. Drink from it, for the water is clear and crisp. This collection is a MUST-READ,” Eric M. Vogt, author of Letters to Lara and Paths and Pools to Ponder. 

 “I have been slow at responding to reviews for Allison Grayhurst due to summer’s busy days, however she brings life to each poem, heart to the images and everyone should have a collection of Grayhurst Poetry,” Ann Johnson-Murphree, poet.

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Interview with Allison Grayhurst and Kyp Harness

Duane's Kyp and Allison's interview Duane's Kyp and Allison's interview 1 Duane's Kyp and Allison's interview 2 Duane's Kyp and Allison's interview 3 Duane's Kyp and Allison's interview 4 Duane's Kyp and Allison's interview 5 Duane's Kyp and Allison's interview 6 Duane's Kyp and Allison's interview 7 Duane's Kyp and Allison's interview 8 Duane's Kyp and Allison's interview 9 Duane's Kyp and Allison's interview 10 Duane's Kyp and Allison's interview 11 Duane's Kyp and Allison's interview 12 Duane's Kyp and Allison's interview 13 Duane's Kyp and Allison's interview 14 Duane's Kyp and Allison's interview 15 Duane's Kyp and Allison's interview 16

http://duanespoetree.blogspot.ca/2016/05/kyp-harness-and-allison-grayhurst.html

 

Interview below:

Kyp Harness: I am from Sarnia, Ontario, and I’ve made 13 independent albums of my original songs that have about 200 songs on them, and I also create Mortimer the Slug, a webcomic, which I have been doing for about 3 years. I have written two books, published by McFarland in the US, ‘The Art of Laurel and Hardy’ and ‘The Art of Charlie Chaplin’.  My novel ‘Wigford Rememberies’ will be published by Nightwood Editions in May 2016; www.kypharness.net; http://www.mortimertheslugcomic.com

 

Allison Grayhurst: I am a vegan. I live in Toronto with my family. I am a member of the League of Canadian Poets. Three of my poems have been nominated for Sundress Publications “Best of the Net” 2015, and I have over 850 poems published in more than 375 international journals and anthologies. I have published twelve books of poetry, six collections, and eight chapbooks, and another chapbook “Currents” pending publication. I also sculpt, working with clay; www.allisongrayhurst.com

 

DV: How did both of you get started in your creative lives, especially in the word game?

 

KH: I’ve been writing stories and drawing pictures almost since I can first remember. I’ve also always written songs in my head.  

 

AG: Writing and an appreciation of language has always been a part of my life, as both of my parents were writers/journalists. Writing just seemed like a natural way of expression to me from the beginning. When I was around five we moved to Spain for a year so my father could work on a novel. My mother and I would write stories together when I was in elementary school, though I didn’t start writing poetry until my first year of high school. I started sculpting and working in clay in my early 20s, and had a phenomenal teacher/mentor and friend in the late Elizabeth Fraser Williamson.

 

DV: So you both got started very early, to the point where it was almost a biological development. Was there ever a time when either of you became jaded about the communication process and seriously considered doing something else with your lives?

 

AG: No, for me, writing poetry is like eating, an essential part of my well-being and existence. I don’t like the publishing part of writing and stopped publishing for fifteen years – part of those reasons were practical – raising our two children – but during that time I always wrote and always planned to get that work out in book form. Yes, often I have felt the futility of being a poet and it has arrested my ability to create, but in the end I have learned that if I am going to continue on, I have to write.

 

KH: Yes, sometimes it gets discouraging and the only reason I keep doing it is because inspiration keeps coming to me, whether it’s about writing or drawing or singing or playing….otherwise I wouldn’t do it, because I sure wouldn’t try to make things happen creatively.  I’ve accepted that I don’t really seem to have a choice, and if I try to stifle inspiration it only makes me unhappy and sick, so I just let it go.
DV: Allison, you’ve obviously been a publishing success. What was it about the “publishing part of writing” that turned you off?

 

AG: I am a very private person and I don’t like putting myself out there or being exposed. I’d rather not, but it is a duty I owe to my art, so I did what I felt compelled to do, as a part of me feels that the completion of art only comes when sharing it.
DV: You’re both multi-talented — poetry, prose, sculpture, music, cartoons — but if for some reason, Apollo’s jealous retribution for overweening hubris or some such, you could only practice one art exclusively, which one would it be?

 

KH: I guess if I were forced to pick one it would be music since you can always get an instantaneous reaction from music, and through the years that I’ve been writing other stuff, which can often be a long slog, the music has kept me going just by playing it, and playing it with and for other people.

 

AG: I enjoy sculpting, get a lot out of it and inspiration from it, but I don’t have to do it, and I have had to let it go at different times for extended periods of my life. Writing poetry for me is an integral part of myself and an ongoing necessity, so I would choose that.

 

DV: Do you remember your first “successful” piece? (I don’t mean commercially successful or popular among your circle — I mean the first one that succeeded in inner terms of self-satisfaction that it had been done “right.”) Would it still pass the self-approval test today?
KH: No not, really — they’re all successful to me, otherwise I wouldn’t have written them.  I can think of a lot of failures I’ve abandoned or thrown away — but if I’ve completed them, they’re successes.

DV: Kyp, in your estimation, what’s the ration between “keepers” and “losers”? Has your throwaway rate changed much over the years? 

KH: Most of my time I’ve continued to write and write and write, and I let the stuff that I remember stay on.  If I forget it I figure it’s not worth remembering and I let it be forgotten.  I do think more of my stuff is keep-worthy now as I get older because I’m more focused and know what I want more, maybe.
AG: The first success I had as a writer was when I found my voice. It was during the process of writing a poetic-prose novel when I was nineteen. I still have it in a filing cabinet. Everything I wrote before that I’ve gotten rid of. I would never publish it, and I haven’t looked at it for many years, but there are probably small parts of it (with much editing) that I would be artistically proud of.
DV: Allison, what was it about? Do its themes still continue through your current work? Has your voice changed?

 

AG: It was called Letters To.. It was a series of poetic love letters to a person, but in actuality they were letters to God. My voice has evolved, changed, undergone many transformations, but it is still the same voice, coming from the same place within me, and all my work remains to and for, and ultimately, about God.
DV: Having a shared artistic interest probably strengthens your marriage in many ways, but I imagine that there must be times when your individual artistic obsessions and tensions must be counter-productive as well? Do either of you have any examples of this that you wouldn’t mind sharing?

AG: I fell in love with Kyp when I first heard him perform his song “Wandering Heart,” and listening to his new creations always catches my breath in wonderment. In my estimation, Kyp is in the top few greatest artists that have ever lived, and sharing this life with him is a consistent blessing and inspiration for me as a person and as an artist.

KH: Nothing has ever been counter-productive in my relationship with Allison. She’s one of the greatest artists and greatest humans ever, so it’s a privilege to live and work beside her, plus she seems to be as insane as I am.

AG: I honestly can’t say that being artists has ever been counter-productive to our marriage. We have been together for 27 years and I have always honored and admired Kyp as an artist and all of his creative works. Throughout the years, even while raising young children, I have felt the same respect afforded to me. In fact, being artists in some way is the pulse of our relationship, and in many ways, it keeps us both alive as individuals, as well as our love.

DV: Kyp, you refer to yourselves as being “insane,” but in this conversation you seem to be more sane than most couples — and certainly most artists — that I know. So, what kind of insanity are you referring to?

KH: I guess the insanity is being sane in an insane world or insane in a sane world.  Either way, I don’t much care.
DV: Are all of your children artistic too?
AG: We have two children, our oldest is 18. She is multi-talented in film, photography and writing, and is also strongly interested in politics. She attended a high school for the arts and is now in her first year at university majoring in film. Our son is 14 and is also attending a high school for the arts, with a focus on drama and visual arts. His most recent passions and pursuits have been archery and kung-fu.
DV: I’d like to give you both an opportunity to talk about your work processes, in some detail. Do you treat your art like a profession, with a regular daily schedule and routine? Do you just wait to be guided by inspiration? Is it mainly a matter of “spontaneous creation” or a long process of pre-planning and extensive revision? Or, for you, is the process something else entirely?
AG: My journey with writing poetry has spanned over decades and my process has undergone many changes. I started writing poetry in high school during classes, then mostly at donut shops or in my room. When my children were young or I had to go to work early, I would wake up at 5 am to get time in before the household got up. Mostly and recently I write when walking my dog. I used to write every day. It was a necessity but also a discipline. Now, I wait for the absolute need to write. Sometimes it happens at inconvenient times – making dinner, in the shower, when trying to fall asleep, etc. Sometimes I write daily, sometimes a week can pass. For a while, I tried to force myself to stop writing, to halt the inspiration and ignore the words in my head, but it ended up making me feel spiritually and physical ill. Now, I really don’t care when I write, it happens often but nothing routine. I usually write in the mornings, always long hand with pen and paper, stick it in a drawer, edit it in long hand until I type it up and edit it a bit again. The last batch of poems I wrote took about six months before I put them on my computer. In terms of editing, I do edit my work, but it is not an intellectual endeavour for me. Writing for me is a visceral process, and hopefully the poem has a rhythm and life of its own – if that is not there, the poem gets trashed. Poems come to me whole and quickly, if they need editing it is usually in small amounts for clarity sake or grammatical corrections. I keep only about one tenth of what I write.
KH: I just wait until it comes. I used to try and force things but that doesn’t work for me and often just made me pissed off…so I just wait until it gets going, and then sometimes later I might have to force it and work at it to get it finished, but in a way that’s the easy part.
DV: Since you both do more than one type of art, is the process the same for all of them? Allison, is sculpting an extension of writing poetry, in terms of how you approach it, or something completely different? Kyp, I see more of a continuity between writing and music, but what about between cartooning and music?
KH: It’s all just writing in one form or another, since it’s all about ideas….ideas you put into drawn lines, or notes of music, or into a dance.  The form the art takes is not that important.

 

AG: Sculpting is something I do, but being a poet is an integral part of my being. I sculpt when I am inspired to. It takes months to finish a piece, and it requires a lot of patience on my part. It is like a sensual meditation. At times I have sculpted daily, at other times there are long stretches when I don’t sculpt at all.

 

DV: You’ve both identified your chief artistic mode of expression as being part of your essence, your very being. How did you branch out from the soul-synonymous art you’ve always done into some new, and different, medium?

 

KH: No, I said it’s all the same ….it’s about ideas, whether they come through movement, singing, drawing, writing or whatever.  If you’re an artist it doesn’t matter how they come out.

 

AG: For me, sculpting offered another form to express creativity when I wasn’t writing. I was drawn to the tactile and grounding nature of working with clay.

 

DV: In your various artistries, do you have any guides, role models? Specifically, what have you learned from them?

 

KH: My earliest guide was Walt Disney.  then he was replaced by Laurel and Hardy…and they were replaced by James Joyce…then he was replaced by John Lennon and Bob Dylan , who was replaced by Dostoevsky and Henry Miller, with garnishes of Kerouac and Faulkner and Virginia Woolf on the side…and overall the poetry of William Blake and Jesus rained down on them — and in reality none of them ever replaced the other, but joined in a nurturing web of soul and brilliance, that taught me to how to see, and taught me who was doing the seeing, and what was being seen…Until now, when I have no guides and role models.

 

AG: As a writer my first and only mentor was Dostoevsky. I found him when I was 16 and his work resonated intimately with me, showing me the transformative powers of language. He taught me ruthless honesty, but above all, the necessity of spiritual commitment in art. My second mentor came as my teacher and friend Elizabeth. She was a great sculptor and a formidable woman – fiercely independent, solitary and never relinquishing her joy in artistic discovery even when age started to debilitate her. She was the best possible teacher, as she guided me through the craft of sculpting while giving me room to seek out and pursue my own inspiration.

 

DV: Are there any specifically Canadian contemporary artists you resonate to?
AG: The question has two things I don’t care about as someone who does art or when experiencing art – nationality and time-era. Great art might reflect those things or use them as part of their backdrop, but ultimately it must transcend those barriers, and any art that doesn’t is boring to me.

 

KH: I don’t recognize nationalistic borders.
DV: Well, then, what about the future? How do you see your art developing from here?

 

KH: I hope to continue getting deeper into the art, going as far as I can with it.  However many years I’ve got left to live, I know I’ll keep doing it, and for me there’s no point in doing it unless I can get to newer deeper places, in whatever medium I’m inspired to work in. That’s what makes it exciting for me, and my goal is to keep excited!
AG: I don’t know. I’ve just completed a goal of having all the poems I wanted published or accepted for publication and it has left space and a sense of freedom inside. I just feel open, patiently in-waiting and excited to see where my writing takes me next.
DV: On that note, I’d like to thank both of you for allowing me to intrude into your creative and personal lives. And, of course, I hope we all get to see, or hear, much more of your work.

 

Allison Grayhurst and Kyp Harness

Quebec City

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Quebec City

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On plains of autumn green

where hardly bird or squirrel roam,

the dream we find by holding hands

is like a wave of sunshine

undulating on our brows.

 

On streets of winding stone, old

as Medusa’s smile, old as wounded

pride resting on an enemy’s throne,

we laugh at the struggling day – mouths

full of kisses and a hunger soothed to sleep

by so many unforced smiles.

 

Up stairs once crushed by cannon ball fire

we lift our limbs to see where the city wall

extends. We are both thinking

of the good day behind, both sniffing

the devouring scent of unforgotten history.

 

Evening drifts through our hair.

We are alone, like all babes are and lovers too

who have perfectly communed

beneath this Northern sky.

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Copyright © 1998 by Allison Grayhurst

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First published in “Cavalcade of Stars” March 2016

Cavalcade of star March 1 Cavalcade of star Quebec City 1 Cavalcade of star Quebec City 2 Cavalcade of star March 2

https://cavalcadeofstars.wordpress.com/2016/03/07/allison-grayhurst-2/

 

You can listen to this poem by clicking below:

 

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“Allison Grayhurst intertwines a potent spirituality throughout her work so that each poem is not simply a statement or observation, but a revelation that demands the reader’s personal involvement. Grayhurst’s poetic genius is profound and evident. Her voice is uniquely authentic, undeniable in its dignified vulnerability as it is in its significance,” Kyp Harness, singer/songwriter, author.

“Allison Grayhurst’s poems are like cathedrals witnessing and articulating in unflinching graphic detail the gritty angst and grief of life, while taking it to rare clarity, calm and comfort. Grayhurst’s work is haunting, majestic and cleansing, often leaving one breathless in the wake of its intelligence, hope, faith and love amidst the muck of life. Many of Allison Grayhurst’s poems are simply masterpieces. Grayhurst’s poetry is a lighthouse of intelligent honour… indeed, intelligence rips through her work like white water,” Taylor Jane Green, Registered Spiritual Psychotherapist and author.

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Review of The Longing To Be: 

“The contents of Allison Grayhurst’s book The Longing To Be are both personal and universal and are described in such thematic and golden terms that one can see that a lot of thought has gone into each line. The poems are written mostly in free verse throughout, with both rhythm and soul weaved into them. For some poems, the layout seems experimental, and there is definitely a playfulness in the way that the words and verses fall onto the page. Others do conform to a “norm”, whatever that is. All are dramatic and thoughtful. These are layered poems with new horizons presented to the reader in every re-read. The effect is to keep things fresh with poems that constantly surprise in spite, and because of, the number of times being read. I thoroughly recommend The Longing To Be as a poetry book to study carefully and cherish far into the future,” poet Brian Shirra.

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